Deciding Which Career Path to Take


“Life is a moving, breathing thing.  We have to be willing to constantly evolve.  Perfection is constant transformation.”—Nia Peeples 

If you are a looking to make a career transition from what you have been doing to a different career path, you are not alone.


Today’s average worker currently holds ten different jobs before age 40 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and it is predicted that number will grow to 12 to 15 jobs in a lifetime.

Having a career/job that not only pays the bills, but also offers job satisfaction and is meaningful have been added to the career mix.  Jobs consume most of our waking hours, thoughts, activities and relationships.  Doing work that aligns with values, talents and interests, as well as, working in an environment that is energizing rather than depleting is essential to being true to oneself and being happy.  

Staying at one job and climbing the ladder to success is not a mainstream career path today.  Ideal career seekers, especially millennials, are changing what was acceptable in the past to new possibilities in the workplace. Staying at one job looking to get to the top rung of the corporate ladder is not job seekers agenda today.  Not that climbing the ladder was bad.  It was the workplace culture and served well during that period.

Just like life is an ongoing process, so are professional choices.  Choices from having 2-4 jobs in a lifetime is increasing to more than double that figure.  There still remains the stigma of being viewed as a “Job hopper,” for those looking for their next career niche, but in time that too shall pass along with the myriad of changes happening in our world. 

Life doesn’t stand still.  We are meant to evolve and become all that we are meant to be.  Change doesn’t stand still – nor should we.   As Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn, says, “You have to maintain a culture of transformation and stay true to your values.” 

Here are some “maybe’s” of why people seek transformation from what they are to doing to something that is calling them: 
 

  • Maybe the job you had no longer exists.  It may have become outdated and replaced with new technology and skills requiring new know-how. 
  • Maybe the career that once was exciting and something to look forward to has become boring and holds little interest.
  • Maybe there was a downsizing or layoff and now is a chance to explore a new career path.
  • Maybe the job doesn’t give you an opportunity to use your skills and creative abilities.   
  • Maybe you majored in a career that has minimum job opportunity or holds little interest and you want something else.
  • Maybe you are looking to make a U-turn to see “what if” you took the road you thought of in the past. 
  • Or maybe _____________ (you fill in the blank for reason to make a career switch).

Whatever the reason, the situation is you are looking for a new career path and looking for answers.  The truth is you hold the answers.  But answers are usually clouded with preconceptions of self-inflicted doubts and false reasoning. Jumping to conclusions without even giving something new the research, discovery and support it deserves is self-sabotage.  Convincing oneself of why something won’t work is limiting beliefs and not answering the call to what’s calling you.  Pick up the call and answer it, you might be surprised at your own brilliance.  

Changing careers is often not easy, nor is hanging on to what no longer works.  Start by looking around at trends and notice what peaks your interest.  And stay away from the noise of inner critics who are afraid of change.  I believe there is more risk in holding back from what you are meant to do next than from following your heart.

This is a time of major transformation throughout the world.  Ignoring it won’t change, but your attitude and actions to growth rather than stagnation changes everything.  Yes you can dream and succeed. 

You are invited to contact me for a complimentary, 30-minute “What’s Next” strategy coaching/consultation session to help in your transition. We will look at where you are and where you want to go; and offer resources to facilitate “what’s next” for you.  If not you, perhaps you know someone else who is stuck in choosing their next career, please pass the invite along.  Thank you.  

 “New technologies and approaches are merging the physical, digital, and biological worlds in ways that will fundamentally transform humankind.  The extent to which that transformation is positive will depend on how we navigate the risks and opportunities that arise along the way.”—Klaus Schwab, Founder & Director, World Economic Forum

You're invited to visit www.righttrackcoaching.com